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NARRATIVE EYE

PROPELLING THE WRITTEN WORD

info@narrative-eye.org.uk  020 8808 7547

EVENTS

Narrative Eye host a range of lectures, workshops and courses throughout the year.

Our previous events have taken place at venues including the National Portrait Gallery, the House of Commons and Nottingham University.

Click here for full details of our previous events.

To arrange an event for your school, workplace, community group please contact info@narrative-eye.org.uk

CLICK FOR A FULL LIST OF PREVIOUS EVENTS

Events in April

in conjunction with Cityread London




Blackamoores in Tudor England - Illuminating a Hidden Time

Tuesday 18th April 2017

6.30-8pm

Library @ The Curve -  William Street, Slough SL1 1XY

Among the glamour and intrigue that surrounds The Tudor period is the untold story of people of African descent who lived and worked throughout England – not as slaves but as members of society. Their lives have been illuminated by the historian Onyeka Nubia in his book Blackamoores: Africans in Tudor England, their Presence, Status and Origins, which involved researching over 250,000 artefacts from archives and parish records.

Records of people such as 'Bastien, a Blackmoore of Mr Willm Hawkins' who was buried on 10th December 1583 in the Plymouth area. William Hawkins was the son of William Hawkins the elder and the brother of John Hawkins, all of whom practised piracy and adventuring along the Barbary coast, west Africa and beyond.

Their lives paint a picture of a Tudor England that we are unfamiliar with, yet is essential to our understanding of this era and the socio-political climate of today.

Join Onyeka during Cityread 2017 as he discusses the Blackamoores of England and how their lives affect us today.


To book visit: https://slough.spydus.co.uk/Events/


Blackamoores and Tudor England - The Untold History of an Influential Era

Tuesday 25th April 2017

6.15-7.45pm

The Library at Willesden Green, 95 High Road, Willesden, London, NW10 2SF

Free entry

Current research proves that the population of Tudor England was considerably more diverse than we have been led to believe. There was a notable population of African people living and working in Tudor England, providing skills and trades. The lives of these people are often omitted from the mainstream teaching of the Tudor period.

Join the historian Onyeka, as he examines this vital research and evaluates the importance of this untold history.

To book visit: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/blackamoores-and-tudor-england-the-untold-history-of-an-influential-era-tickets-31681973636


Shakespeare’s other countrymen: ‘Blackamoore wenches’ and Barbary African ‘king children’ in Tudor England

Sunday 30th April 2017

2-3:15pm

Phoenix Cinema - 52 High Road, East Finchley, London N2 9PJ

£5 (£3 concessions)

Cinema is a powerful tool that unites us and divides us. It provides us with an escape from the monotonous cycle of our daily lives. A seemingly one dimensional experience can stimulate all of our senses and can evoke within us emotions that we may not consciously wish to express – anger, fear, sorrow, elation.

We turn to cinema to provide us with an alternative version of history that captures the essence of a period in a way that may be lacking through merely reading textbooks. The Tudor era, a period that is widely celebrated in cinema, contains a vast resource of history concerning politics, war, exploration and fashion. However, what is often lacking from representations of Tudor England, particularly depictions of Shakespeare's work, is the diversity of ethnicities residing in England.

 Join the historians Onyeka, Robin Walker and Tony Warner,  as they examine Shakespeare's other countrymen and the significance of their story in Tudor England.


To book visit: https://phoenixcinema.co.uk/PhoenixCinema.dll/Booking?Booking=TSelectItems.waSelectItemsPrompt.TcsWebMenuItem_0.TcsWebTab_0.TcsPerformance_10073021.TcsSection_726